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Hospitals are now pressured to provide vegan food

For many hospital patients, the food they are served is like adding insult to injury. And if you happen to be a hospitalized vegan or vegetarian, your options might indeed be very bleak. Fortunately, the U.S. Vegan Climate ETF is trying to change that. They are pressuring hospitals to provide plant-based options at every meal for patients, in vending machines and in the cafeterias frequented by staff, visitors and outpatients.

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The U.S. Vegan Climate ETF (VEGN) represents nearly $65 million in assets under management. It’s sent shareholder proposals to the board of directors at Centene, Elevance Health, HCA Healthcare, Molina Healthcare and United Health Group (UNH) regarding making vegan food widely available in hospitals. The ETF’s advisor, Beyond Investing LLC, wants these proposals to be included in the proxy statements these companies will send to shareholders as they prepare for their 2023 annual meetings.

Related: This healthcare center maximizes energy use and greenery

“We launched VEGN to be a force for good and a means for investors to use their capital to effect positive change,” said Claire Smith, CEO of Beyond Investing. “We call on other shareholders in these companies to support our proposed resolutions and bring about better health outcomes for patients and improve these companies’ bottom lines.”

In the meantime, the Vegetarian Resource Group has written this helpful guide for hospitalized vegans. The ETF’s strategy is not just to support veg hospital patients, but emphasizes that plant-based food is a healthier choice for patients in general. Afterall, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine has proclaimed that plant-based diets help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and many cancers. The World Health Organization classifies processed meat as carcinogenic to humans and deems it a major contributor to colorectal cancer.

Furthermore, using hospitalization as a teachable moment to improve health habits, including a better diet, could actually save hospitals money. The Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, under the Affordable Care Act, reduces the amount of money hospitals get if patients are readmitted within 30 days of being discharged from a previous hospital stay. Eating better, such as sticking to a plant-based, whole food diet, is one of many ways people can improve their health.

Via Beyond Investing

Lead image via Beyond Investing


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From Greggs’ vegan expansion to botanical beverages

In this week’s round-up of innovation from across Europe, we hear about BetterF!sh’s new distribution deal that will see it sold in almost 160 restaurants around Europe; we discover Princes’ premium line of botanical beverages; and learn of the expansion of Greggs’ vegan offering through a tie-up with THIS. Scroll through the gallery for the latest product development news. 

Pic: GettyImages-Motortion


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How to make a festive vegan orange chocolate tart

Inclusive of different food needs (Picture: Oatly)

It’s orange chocolate time again.

For those wanting to ‘wow’ this Christmas, we have a vegan showstopper dessert that’s perfect for different food needs around the table.

This orange chocolate tart serves 10 to 12 people and takes an hour to prep, 23 minutes to cook, then eight and half hours to chill – so it’s not a quick one to whip up.

But at this time of year – when more time goes into food and hosting others happens in higher numbers – it might be exactly the baking challenge you want to give yourself.

The tart has a chocolate pastry base and a creamy chocolate orange ganache filling, then is topped with chocolate shavings and orange zest.

You can make it up to two days before your big event, and any leftovers can be enjoyed with a cup of tea the next day. 

Here’s how to do it, with the recipe courtesy of Oatly.

Vegan orange chocolate tart recipe

Ingredients

Delicious (Picture: Oatly)

For the chocolate shortcrust pastry:

  • 150g plain flour 
  • 90g icing sugar
  • 40g cocoa powder 
  • 95g cold vegan butter, cubed
  • 40g cold non-dairy milk plant-based drink (e.g Oatly’s Oat Drink Whole)

For the chocolate orange ganache filling:

  • 450g dark chocolate (55-65% cocoa solids), chopped
  • 60g vegan butter, cubed
  • 360g Oatly Whippable Creamy Oat
  • zest of 1-2 unwaxed oranges 

For the vegan whipped cream:

  • 175g Oatly Whippable Creamy Oat
  • 20g icing sugar, sifted
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla bean paste
  • Chocolate shavings and orange zest, for decoration

Recipe

For the chocolate shortcrust pastry:

  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, icing sugar and cocoa powder. Add the vegan butter and work it into the dry ingredients until you get a mixture resembling breadcrumbs.
  2. Add the non-dairy milk and mix well until the dough starts coming together, then give it a gentle knead until the dough forms a smooth ball. If the pastry feels too soft to handle and roll out, you can chill it in the fridge for 30 minutes before proceeding, but it shouldn’t be necessary.
  3. Roll out your pastry until it’s about 3-4mm thin and use it to line a 9-inch/23cm loose bottom tart tin (about 3.5cm deep). Cut away any excess pastry.
  4. Chill the pastry in the fridge for 30 minutes. In the meantime, pre-heat the oven to 180ºC. 
  5. Lightly prick the bottom of the chilled pastry with a fork, line it with a sheet of baking paper, fill with pie weights (rice or dried beans work too) and blind bake for 15 minutes.
  6. Remove the pie weights and baking paper and bake for a further 8-10 minutes or until the pastry is fully baked through and crisp.

For the chocolate orange ganache filling:

  1. Place the chocolate and vegan butter into a large heat-proof bowl.
  2. In a saucepan over medium heat, bring the Oatly Whippable Creamy Oat to a boil and then pour over the chocolate. Allow to stand for 3-4 minutes, then stir together into a smooth ganache. Add the orange zest and stir until well combined.
  3. Pour into the tart shell, smooth out the top and chill in the fridge for at least 8 hours or ideally overnight.

For the vegan whipped cream:

  1. In a large bowl, whip together the Oatly Whippable Creamy Oat, icing sugar and vanilla until soft peaks form.
  2. Spoon over the chilled chocolate tart, decorate with chocolate shavings and orange zest, and serve.

Do you have a story to share?

Get in touch by emailing MetroLifestyleTeam@Metro.co.uk.


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Israel’s vegan revolutionary now spreading word on plant-based food in New York

At the forefront of the vegan revolution in Israel, Omri Paz, the founder of Vegan Friendly, has now set his sights on bringing his model to the United States market.

Vegan Friendly, a self-sustaining nonprofit founded in 2012 to promote veganism and animal rights and improve access to plant-based food, is planning to expand its activities to the US after launching in the United Kingdom about two and a half years ago.

“What makes us unique that we have created a huge ecosystem that gives businesses and restaurants benefits, much more than just the labeling or certification of being vegan friendly,” Paz told The Times of Israel. “With us, they can participate in our events, and we can connect them to thousands of our members through exposure on social media, our app and the website.”

In Israel, which hosts the world’s highest per capita vegan population, 1,800 businesses including restaurants and hotels are certified with the pink and green Vegan Friendly heart sticker. Over 500 food manufacturers such as Unilever, Nestle, and Strauss use the Vegan Friendly seal to label over 10,000 plant-based products certifying that they meet strict criteria.

Additionally, Vegan Friendly has built a community of over 6,000 people in Israel who donate a monthly sum toward the organization’s attempts to raise awareness and encourage veganism or vegetarianism, Paz said. Together with the Tel Aviv Municipality, Vegan Friendly this year hosted a three-day Vegan Fest touted as the world’s largest vegan event, with cooking classes, food stands, food-tech and health stalls.

“From the businesses who sign up with us we get discounts or products to try out, which our members can enjoy at hundreds of businesses and restaurants across the country,” said Paz. “Our model gives businesses and restaurants lots of value for certifying and that helps us to promote veganism and make it more accessible.”

With the use of big campaigns involving billboards, YouTube lectures and primetime TV ads, Vegan Friendly seeks to create a dietary change.

Omri Paz, founder of Vegan Friendly. (Courtesy/Vegan Friendly)

“We applied our model to the UK two and a half years ago and today we have a team of almost 10 people with about 200,000 followers on social media, 1,200 businesses or branches certified as being vegan friendly, and over 3,000 products labeled as vegan friendly,” said Paz.

“I don’t think there’s any big organization in the US that is going to focus on dietary change, which is important to us,” he noted.

Vegetarians make up about 5% of the US population. For the US launch, Vegan Friendly went through 50,000 restaurants and businesses and selected about 15,000 that meet the criteria to be certified as vegan friendly. Initially, the nonprofit will be focusing on restaurants located in New York City.

“At the first stage we aim to launch a community through social media, on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, LinkedIn, Twitter, and to get users on our app and the website before we plan to approach restaurants and ask them to be certified as vegan-friendly by adding options to their menu,” said Paz. “We already have 20 businesses that signed with us to be vegan friendly certified businesses.”

Paz disclosed that the first restaurant that received its vegan friendly certification in the US is The Grey Dog, a neighborhood restaurant with five branches spread across Manhattan.

“Two years from now we aim to have about half a million followers and about 5,000 businesses that sign up with us either for the restaurant certification or  product certification,” said Paz.

Looking ahead, Vegan Friendly seeks by 2029 to grow to a team of about 160 people generating revenue of $60 million and being completely self-sustainable, according to Paz.


Israeli politics told straight

I joined The Times of Israel after many years covering US and Israeli politics for Hebrew news outlets.

I believe responsible coverage of Israeli politicians means presenting a 360 degree view of their words and deeds – not only conveying what occurs, but also what that means in the broader context of Israeli society and the region.

That’s hard to do because you can rarely take politicians at face value – you must go the extra mile to present full context and try to overcome your own biases.

I’m proud of our work that tells the story of Israeli politics straight and comprehensively. I believe Israel is stronger and more democratic when professional journalists do that tough job well.

Your support for our work by joining The Times of Israel Community helps ensure we can continue to do so.

Thank you,
Tal Schneider, Political Correspondent


Join Our Community


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You’re a dedicated reader

That’s why we started the Times of Israel ten years ago – to provide discerning readers like you with must-read coverage of Israel and the Jewish world.

So now we have a request. Unlike other news outlets, we haven’t put up a paywall. But as the journalism we do is costly, we invite readers for whom The Times of Israel has become important to help support our work by joining The Times of Israel Community.

For as little as $6 a month you can help support our quality journalism while enjoying The Times of Israel AD-FREE, as well as accessing exclusive content available only to Times of Israel Community members.

Thank you,
David Horovitz, Founding Editor of The Times of Israel


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Israel’s vegan revolutionary now spreading word on plant-based food in New York

At the forefront of the vegan revolution in Israel, Omri Paz, the founder of Vegan Friendly, has now set his sights on bringing his model to the United States market.

Vegan Friendly, a self-sustaining nonprofit founded in 2012 to promote veganism and animal rights and improve access to plant-based food, is planning to expand its activities to the US after launching in the United Kingdom about two and a half years ago.

“What makes us unique that we have created a huge ecosystem that gives businesses and restaurants benefits, much more than just the labeling or certification of being vegan friendly,” Paz told The Times of Israel. “With us, they can participate in our events, and we can connect them to thousands of our members through exposure on social media, our app and the website.”

In Israel, which hosts the world’s highest per capita vegan population, 1,800 businesses including restaurants and hotels are certified with the pink and green Vegan Friendly heart sticker. Over 500 food manufacturers such as Unilever, Nestle, and Strauss use the Vegan Friendly seal to label over 10,000 plant-based products certifying that they meet strict criteria.

Additionally, Vegan Friendly has built a community of over 6,000 people in Israel who donate a monthly sum toward the organization’s attempts to raise awareness and encourage veganism or vegetarianism, Paz said. Together with the Tel Aviv Municipality, Vegan Friendly this year hosted a three-day Vegan Fest touted as the world’s largest vegan event, with cooking classes, food stands, food-tech and health stalls.

“From the businesses who sign up with us we get discounts or products to try out, which our members can enjoy at hundreds of businesses and restaurants across the country,” said Paz. “Our model gives businesses and restaurants lots of value for certifying and that helps us to promote veganism and make it more accessible.”

With the use of big campaigns involving billboards, YouTube lectures and primetime TV ads, Vegan Friendly seeks to create a dietary change.

Omri Paz, founder of Vegan Friendly. (Courtesy/Vegan Friendly)

“We applied our model to the UK two and a half years ago and today we have a team of almost 10 people with about 200,000 followers on social media, 1,200 businesses or branches certified as being vegan friendly, and over 3,000 products labeled as vegan friendly,” said Paz.

“I don’t think there’s any big organization in the US that is going to focus on dietary change, which is important to us,” he noted.

Vegetarians make up about 5% of the US population. For the US launch, Vegan Friendly went through 50,000 restaurants and businesses and selected about 15,000 that meet the criteria to be certified as vegan friendly. Initially, the nonprofit will be focusing on restaurants located in New York City.

“At the first stage we aim to launch a community through social media, on Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, LinkedIn, Twitter, and to get users on our app and the website before we plan to approach restaurants and ask them to be certified as vegan-friendly by adding options to their menu,” said Paz. “We already have 20 businesses that signed with us to be vegan friendly certified businesses.”

Paz disclosed that the first restaurant that received its vegan friendly certification in the US is The Grey Dog, a neighborhood restaurant with five branches spread across Manhattan.

“Two years from now we aim to have about half a million followers and about 5,000 businesses that sign up with us either for the restaurant certification or  product certification,” said Paz.

Looking ahead, Vegan Friendly seeks by 2029 to grow to a team of about 160 people generating revenue of $60 million and being completely self-sustainable, according to Paz.


Israeli politics told straight

I joined The Times of Israel after many years covering US and Israeli politics for Hebrew news outlets.

I believe responsible coverage of Israeli politicians means presenting a 360 degree view of their words and deeds – not only conveying what occurs, but also what that means in the broader context of Israeli society and the region.

That’s hard to do because you can rarely take politicians at face value – you must go the extra mile to present full context and try to overcome your own biases.

I’m proud of our work that tells the story of Israeli politics straight and comprehensively. I believe Israel is stronger and more democratic when professional journalists do that tough job well.

Your support for our work by joining The Times of Israel Community helps ensure we can continue to do so.

Thank you,
Tal Schneider, Political Correspondent


Join Our Community


Join Our Community

Already a member? Sign in to stop seeing this


You’re a dedicated reader

That’s why we started the Times of Israel ten years ago – to provide discerning readers like you with must-read coverage of Israel and the Jewish world.

So now we have a request. Unlike other news outlets, we haven’t put up a paywall. But as the journalism we do is costly, we invite readers for whom The Times of Israel has become important to help support our work by joining The Times of Israel Community.

For as little as $6 a month you can help support our quality journalism while enjoying The Times of Israel AD-FREE, as well as accessing exclusive content available only to Times of Israel Community members.

Thank you,
David Horovitz, Founding Editor of The Times of Israel


Join Our Community


Join Our Community

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Vegan Dad Shares How Hard It Is to Eat Vegan at Disney

  • I’m a dad to two kids, and my whole family is vegan. 
  • We traveled to Disney, and while the vegan options for adults were great, kids’ options were not. 
  • The solution is as easy as adding vegan mac and cheese or Impossible nuggets to their menus. 

I’m raising my kids vegan, and it’s a real challenge at times. While vegan options are growing everywhere, from fast food to grocery stores, the US is still an omnivore-centered country. One reason we were excited about visiting Disney World is its reputation for vegan cuisine.

In fact, Disney World offers some of the best plant-based dining options in the country — unless you’re a kid. 

My wife and I loved the food, but our kids didn’t have many options

The vegan dining for adults at Disney is exceptional. Whether you want a fast-service Impossible burger or a three-course, plant-based custom-dining experience, there really is so much wonderful vegan food at Disney World. Disney’s chefs have created exemplary and delicious foods, and we were impressed that so much of it is unique. Instead of mock meats and dishes that simply try to replicate non-vegan tastes with plants, most of the vegan options are unique and wonderful. The California Grill at the Contemporary Resort offered a 50th Anniversary three-course vegan dinner that was particularly tasty. 

While my wife and I were satisfied and stuffed, our kids were always left on the sidelines. At each restaurant we visited, we encountered a similar situation, the kids’ menu offered vegetarian options — usually mac and cheese — but nothing for vegans. There are vegan options for kids in some restaurants, but not all of them. 

This left us with two options at every place we ate. We could order adult-size vegan dishes for our kids, which meant paying twice the cost of a kid’s plate, knowing the kids likely wouldn’t eat much. Or we could give our kids non-vegan food. 

We had to think outside the box to feed our kids

Faced with not wanting to buy our kids adult-sized meals, our main tactic ended up being vegan snacks. Lots of popcorn, vegan ice cream, french fries, and fruit between meals. At actual sit-down restaurants, we didn’t feed our kids much.

We could’ve gone vegetarian easily, but not vegan. We did encourage the kids to try our food, but gourmet cuisine isn’t necessarily appealing to children. We tried to always order fruit cups, fries, and applesauce at every restaurant we went to as sides to our adult dishes, which the kids ate as meals.

In addition, we had packed vegan protein bars with us, and we brought them to the parks. Feeding the kids a bar a day helped ensure they received protein and something substantial. We had few other choices and we were disappointed that Disney had no true vegan main-course choices for children.

The solution to me is simple. Disney is a family destination that’s trying very hard to cater to all dietary restrictions. The parks already offer Impossible-brand vegan food for adults, so putting some Impossible nuggets on the kids’ menus could be a simple start. Another simple solution is to offer vegan mac and cheese for children, a dish that is already on most restaurants’ menus.

As a vegan parent, I shouldn’t have to worry when I go to a restaurant if it will have a kids’ menu we can use. 


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Fun With Kids: Go-karting at Changi Airport, ChildAid charity concert, free e-book for World Vegan Month

A cast of more than 100 young talent aged six to 18 will take the stage at this year’s ChildAid charity concert. It returns as a big bash after two editions of pandemic restrictions.

Expect to hear chart-topping hits of K-pop boy band BTS, popular anthems of the 2017 musical film The Greatest Showman, an Abba medley and more.

The songs form the backdrop to a story of a group of friends travelling through enchanted worlds with amazing characters.

The performers include 13-year-old Lim Jing Rui, who can whistle just about any tune, including the musically complex Queen Of The Night from Mozart’s The Magic Flute opera.

Organised by The Straits Times and The Business Times, ChildAid has been running for 18 years and raises funds for two charities. The Straits Times School Pocket Money Fund helps underprivileged children pay for lunch and transport to and from school. The Business Times Budding Artists Fund helps artistically talented kids from disadvantaged families pursue their passions.

Catch the 90-minute concert at National University of Singapore’s University Cultural Centre on Dec 13 at 7.30pm.

Tickets priced at $18, $28 and $38 are available via Ticketmaster (str.sg/ca22tickets), and at The Star Performing Arts Centre box office and SingPost outlets.

Find out more at www.facebook.com/ChildAid

Read: Picture book Penguins Eat Pancakes


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Even with inflation, eating vegan is still a bargain

Ellen Jaffe Jones, author of the cookbook “Eat Vegan on $4 a Day,” speaks at the recent Tampa Bay VegFest about how to use vegan eating to lower costs. Photo courtesy of Ellen Jaffe Jones

With inflation hiking grocery bills above 11 percent in the past year, vegan cookbook author Ellen Jaffe Jones is getting more calls about how to use the inherent low-cost of vegan meals to bring down those bills.

“You’re the third person who’s called in recent weeks,” Jones told me when I reached her by phone at her home in Sarasota, Florida. Jones, a former TV journalist who covered consumer finance, wrote a cookbook on the subject in 2011 called “Eat Vegan on $4 a Day.” The weekend before we talked, she spoke at the Tampa Bay VegFest about how vegan eating can save money at the grocery store.

Before I rang her, I went to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ online inflation calculator and plugged in $4 in 2011 and learned it is equivalent to $5.23 a day in 2022 dollars. Still sounds like a bargain to me, but Jones said the prices of vegan basics, such as beans and rice, have not risen that much. She questioned whether the estimated increase is entirely accurate for basic vegan food.

“On Friday, I hopped over to Walmart to check my prices,” Jones told me. “The beans and rice I used in ‘Eat Vegan’ are exactly the same price as they were in 2011, or a fraction of a penny less.”

Jones said raw white rice cost 3 cents an ounce and dried pinto beans 2 cents an ounce on her recent price check – the same as in 2011. Jones said four ounces is an average serving size of protein-rich foods, making a bowl of beans and rice (2 ounces of each) a 10-cent meal.

Jones, who turned 70 last weekend and is a competitive runner, counsels people to consider that vegan eating not only saves money on their grocery bills but also on their medical bills and their climate change bills.

“Our current model is not a sustainable model.” Jones said. “Being sick is extremely expensive. My parents were so sick with heart disease, arthritis and then dementia, they missed out on time with the next generation. They never could lift my kids. For the planet, vegan is the best, hands down.”

While bean and rice prices remain stable, Jones said vegan shoppers will experience cost increases when they buy processed foods and fresh produce. Jones advises people to avoid processed foods, to buy frozen fruits and vegetables, and to cook simple meals from scratch at home.

“People say, ‘I don’t have time to cook,’” Jones said. “I say that cancer, heart disease and diabetes are the real time wasters.”

Fresh or frozen vegetables work in this ramen stir fry, a quick and inexpensive lunch option. Photo by Avery Yale Kamila

Avery’s Vegetable Ramen Stir Fry

This simple stir fry is a budget-friendly way to stretch fresh vegetables or jazz up frozen ones, and it saves money with its short, plant-based ingredient list. I work at home and often make this quick dish for lunch, using leftover chopped vegetables. The recipe can easily be doubled or tripled, and the vegetables can change to match whatever is available.

Serves 2

Vegetable oil
1 onion, sliced into half circles
1 small carrot, cut into bite-sized pieces
2 cups chopped vegetables (such as fresh cabbage, kale, collards, Brussels sprouts, broccoli or cauliflower; or frozen broccoli, peas, green beans, corn or greens)
2 cakes ramen noodles (or another pasta, to equal 2 cups when cooked)
1 cup peanuts, crushed
2 tablespoons soy sauce or tamari
1 tablespoon hot sauce (optional)

Heat a frying pan over medium-high heat. Once the pan is warm, drizzle it with vegetable oil and add the onions. Allow the onions to soften slightly and brown, about 5 minutes; watch carefully so the onions don’t burn. Once about a third of the onions have browned, add the carrots and other vegetables. Cook for another 5 minutes, stirring regularly.

Meanwhile, cook the noodles according to the package instructions. After you’ve drained them, add the noodles to the hot frying pan with the vegetables and cook for another few minutes, turning the mixture to combine and cook regularly. Turn off the heat. Add the peanuts, soy sauce and hot sauce and mix thoroughly. Serve.

25 LOW-COST VEGAN PANTRY STAPLES

I always keep these 25 inexpensive ingredients on hand and as a result am ready to make multiple, low-cost, nutrient-dense vegan dishes at a moment’s notice. In addition to potatoes, I consider three perishable vegetables (onions, carrots, cabbage) and one perishable fruit (apples) among my must-have pantry staples. All are nutrient-dense, have long shelf lives and are grown on local farms. Three essential vegan seasonings – soy sauce, tomato sauce and nutritional yeast – are low-cost ways of delivering high-quality flavor boosts.

Overnight oats, beans on toast, peanut butter sandwiches, vegan mac and cheese, grilled mac and cheese sandwiches, burritos, lentil soup, mujadara wraps, bean-corn chili, potato soup, veggie burgers, black bean soup, vegetable stir fry, lentil loaf, hummus pasta with peas, vegan Shepherd’s pie with tomato lentils, peanut noodles with carrots and edamame-corn noodle bowls are just some of the possibilities with these 25 simple, pantry staples.

Rice
Oatmeal
Raisins
Potatoes
Pasta
Noodles
Bread
Tortillas
Flour
Peanuts
Peanut butter
Beans
Lentils
Hummus
Soy milk
Frozen peas
Frozen lima beans
Frozen corn
Onions
Carrots
Cabbage
Apples
Soy sauce
Nutritional yeast
Tomato sauce

SAVE WITH FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Fresh fruits and vegetables can be pricey and their shelf life is short. One way to reduce the cost and the potential for food waste is to purchase fruits and vegetables from the frozen section. Frozen fruits and vegetables are flash frozen, preserving their nutrient content at its peak. Frozen vegetables can be steamed and sprinkled with nutritional yeast or added to stir fries and soups. Frozen fruits liven up oatmeal, porridge and baked goods, and for a splurge night can transform into smoothies.

INEXPENSIVE VEGAN MEAL IDEAS

I start all budget-friendly, vegan meals with a grain or a starch, and then I add vegetables and a low-cost protein, such as peanuts, peas or canned beans. I lower the cost of beans even further by buying and cooking dried beans rather than using canned.

Green pea stir fry = sautéed onion + frozen green peas + cooked rice + soy sauce

Hummus baked potato = baked potato + hummus + sautéed onion + frozen green vegetable, cooked

Simple vegetable soup = onion + tomato sauce + 1 diced potato + 1 can of beans + frozen green peas + frozen corn + frozen lima beans + 1 cup uncooked pasta

BUDGET-FRIENDLY COOKBOOK

“BOSH! on a Budget,” by Henry Firth and Ian Theasby, 2022, HQ, $24.99.

The popular British social media stars behind the online vegan TV channel BOSH released their latest book in the best-selling BOSH! series in the United Kingdom last year. This year, just as inflation keeps climbing, it’s landed here in the U.S.

“BOSH! on a Budget” is the perfect book for those who enjoy both bold flavors and cutting costs. While these aren’t frugal recipes in terms of ingredient lists or prep time, they do save money with make-at-home recipes for plant-based basics, including tofu, granola, pasta, crumpets, naan, focaccia, injera, hummus, tater tots, soup stocks and sauces.

The book also encourages the economy of batch cooking. Recipes range from Bombay potato salad and lockdown chili ramen to tacos acorazados and jackfruit larb. Desserts include recipes for Right Good Rice Pud, Lemon Drizzle Traycake and Mississippi Mud Pie. The book makes a perfect holiday gift for anyone looking to trim food costs while eating well.

Avery Yale Kamila is a food writer who lives in Portland. She can be reached at [email protected]
Twitter: AveryYaleKamila


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Even with inflation, eating vegan is still a bargain

Ellen Jaffe Jones, author of the cookbook “Eat Vegan on $4 a Day,” speaks at the recent Tampa Bay VegFest about how to use vegan eating to lower costs. Photo courtesy of Ellen Jaffe Jones

With inflation hiking grocery bills above 11 percent in the past year, vegan cookbook author Ellen Jaffe Jones is getting more calls about how to use the inherent low-cost of vegan meals to bring down those bills.

“You’re the third person who’s called in recent weeks,” Jones told me when I reached her by phone at her home in Sarasota, Florida. Jones, a former TV journalist who covered consumer finance, wrote a cookbook on the subject in 2011 called “Eat Vegan on $4 a Day.” The weekend before we talked, she spoke at the Tampa Bay VegFest about how vegan eating can save money at the grocery store.

Before I rang her, I went to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ online inflation calculator and plugged in $4 in 2011 and learned it is equivalent to $5.23 a day in 2022 dollars. Still sounds like a bargain to me, but Jones said the prices of vegan basics, such as beans and rice, have not risen that much. She questioned whether the estimated increase is entirely accurate for basic vegan food.

“On Friday, I hopped over to Walmart to check my prices,” Jones told me. “The beans and rice I used in ‘Eat Vegan’ are exactly the same price as they were in 2011, or a fraction of a penny less.”

Jones said raw white rice cost 3 cents an ounce and dried pinto beans 2 cents an ounce on her recent price check – the same as in 2011. Jones said four ounces is an average serving size of protein-rich foods, making a bowl of beans and rice (2 ounces of each) a 10-cent meal.

Jones, who turned 70 last weekend and is a competitive runner, counsels people to consider that vegan eating not only saves money on their grocery bills but also on their medical bills and their climate change bills.

“Our current model is not a sustainable model.” Jones said. “Being sick is extremely expensive. My parents were so sick with heart disease, arthritis and then dementia, they missed out on time with the next generation. They never could lift my kids. For the planet, vegan is the best, hands down.”

While bean and rice prices remain stable, Jones said vegan shoppers will experience cost increases when they buy processed foods and fresh produce. Jones advises people to avoid processed foods, to buy frozen fruits and vegetables, and to cook simple meals from scratch at home.

“People say, ‘I don’t have time to cook,’” Jones said. “I say that cancer, heart disease and diabetes are the real time wasters.”

Fresh or frozen vegetables work in this ramen stir fry, a quick and inexpensive lunch option. Photo by Avery Yale Kamila

Avery’s Vegetable Ramen Stir Fry

This simple stir fry is a budget-friendly way to stretch fresh vegetables or jazz up frozen ones, and it saves money with its short, plant-based ingredient list. I work at home and often make this quick dish for lunch, using leftover chopped vegetables. The recipe can easily be doubled or tripled, and the vegetables can change to match whatever is available.

Serves 2

Vegetable oil
1 onion, sliced into half circles
1 small carrot, cut into bite-sized pieces
2 cups chopped vegetables (such as fresh cabbage, kale, collards, Brussels sprouts, broccoli or cauliflower; or frozen broccoli, peas, green beans, corn or greens)
2 cakes ramen noodles (or another pasta, to equal 2 cups when cooked)
1 cup peanuts, crushed
2 tablespoons soy sauce or tamari
1 tablespoon hot sauce (optional)

Heat a frying pan over medium-high heat. Once the pan is warm, drizzle it with vegetable oil and add the onions. Allow the onions to soften slightly and brown, about 5 minutes; watch carefully so the onions don’t burn. Once about a third of the onions have browned, add the carrots and other vegetables. Cook for another 5 minutes, stirring regularly.

Meanwhile, cook the noodles according to the package instructions. After you’ve drained them, add the noodles to the hot frying pan with the vegetables and cook for another few minutes, turning the mixture to combine and cook regularly. Turn off the heat. Add the peanuts, soy sauce and hot sauce and mix thoroughly. Serve.

25 LOW-COST VEGAN PANTRY STAPLES

I always keep these 25 inexpensive ingredients on hand and as a result am ready to make multiple, low-cost, nutrient-dense vegan dishes at a moment’s notice. In addition to potatoes, I consider three perishable vegetables (onions, carrots, cabbage) and one perishable fruit (apples) among my must-have pantry staples. All are nutrient-dense, have long shelf lives and are grown on local farms. Three essential vegan seasonings – soy sauce, tomato sauce and nutritional yeast – are low-cost ways of delivering high-quality flavor boosts.

Overnight oats, beans on toast, peanut butter sandwiches, vegan mac and cheese, grilled mac and cheese sandwiches, burritos, lentil soup, mujadara wraps, bean-corn chili, potato soup, veggie burgers, black bean soup, vegetable stir fry, lentil loaf, hummus pasta with peas, vegan Shepherd’s pie with tomato lentils, peanut noodles with carrots and edamame-corn noodle bowls are just some of the possibilities with these 25 simple, pantry staples.

Rice
Oatmeal
Raisins
Potatoes
Pasta
Noodles
Bread
Tortillas
Flour
Peanuts
Peanut butter
Beans
Lentils
Hummus
Soy milk
Frozen peas
Frozen lima beans
Frozen corn
Onions
Carrots
Cabbage
Apples
Soy sauce
Nutritional yeast
Tomato sauce

SAVE WITH FROZEN FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Fresh fruits and vegetables can be pricey and their shelf life is short. One way to reduce the cost and the potential for food waste is to purchase fruits and vegetables from the frozen section. Frozen fruits and vegetables are flash frozen, preserving their nutrient content at its peak. Frozen vegetables can be steamed and sprinkled with nutritional yeast or added to stir fries and soups. Frozen fruits liven up oatmeal, porridge and baked goods, and for a splurge night can transform into smoothies.

INEXPENSIVE VEGAN MEAL IDEAS

I start all budget-friendly, vegan meals with a grain or a starch, and then I add vegetables and a low-cost protein, such as peanuts, peas or canned beans. I lower the cost of beans even further by buying and cooking dried beans rather than using canned.

Green pea stir fry = sautéed onion + frozen green peas + cooked rice + soy sauce

Hummus baked potato = baked potato + hummus + sautéed onion + frozen green vegetable, cooked

Simple vegetable soup = onion + tomato sauce + 1 diced potato + 1 can of beans + frozen green peas + frozen corn + frozen lima beans + 1 cup uncooked pasta

BUDGET-FRIENDLY COOKBOOK

“BOSH! on a Budget,” by Henry Firth and Ian Theasby, 2022, HQ, $24.99.

The popular British social media stars behind the online vegan TV channel BOSH released their latest book in the best-selling BOSH! series in the United Kingdom last year. This year, just as inflation keeps climbing, it’s landed here in the U.S.

“BOSH! on a Budget” is the perfect book for those who enjoy both bold flavors and cutting costs. While these aren’t frugal recipes in terms of ingredient lists or prep time, they do save money with make-at-home recipes for plant-based basics, including tofu, granola, pasta, crumpets, naan, focaccia, injera, hummus, tater tots, soup stocks and sauces.

The book also encourages the economy of batch cooking. Recipes range from Bombay potato salad and lockdown chili ramen to tacos acorazados and jackfruit larb. Desserts include recipes for Right Good Rice Pud, Lemon Drizzle Traycake and Mississippi Mud Pie. The book makes a perfect holiday gift for anyone looking to trim food costs while eating well.

Avery Yale Kamila is a food writer who lives in Portland. She can be reached at [email protected]
Twitter: AveryYaleKamila


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5 Incredible Recipes To Impress Your Friends And Family

The start of any vegan journey is often a bumpy ride, and many of us end up discovering a whole host of foods they had no idea aren’t vegan. Roast potatoes are a notable example. 

While this iconic Christmas dinner dish may seem like an innocent and completely plant-based part of the holiday season, they are actually often made with goose fat or beef dripping. 

These ingredients supposedly improve the taste. They have a high smoking point, meaning they make the potatoes crispy without burning them. But they also render what should be a completely vegan vegetable dish as unsuitable for meat-free diners. 

Thankfully, though, there is absolutely no need to use any animal products to make them. A huge number of vegan chefs and bloggers have perfected the art of vegan roast potatoes. Here are our picks of some of the best (and don’t forget to pair them with these delicious plant-based turkey recipes)

Vegan roast potato recipe from Avant Garde Vegan

Avant Garde Vegan roast potato recipe
Avante Garde Vegan Welsh chef Avante Garde Vegan has amassed a huge following for his plant-based recipes

Gaz Oakley – also known as Avant Garde Vegan – has amassed a huge following for his plant-based recipes. 

The Welsh chef has perfected his own roast potato recipe, which are crispy enough for even the pickiest of eaters. 

Ingredients: 

  • 1kg/2.2 lbs Maris Piper Potatoes, peeled
  • 1/2 cup/120ml Vegetable Oil
  • 3 tbs Olive Oil
  • 4 tbs Plain Flour or Gluten-Free Flour
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1 tsp Cracked Black Pepper
  • 3 Sprigs Fresh Rosemary
  • Handful Fresh Sage Leaves
  • 3 Shallots, peeled & quartered
  • 4 cloves of Garlic
  • Pinch Celery Salt
  • Pinch Cayenne Pepper

Find the method here

Vegan roast potato recipe from So Vegan

So Vegan roast potato recipe
So Vegan So Vegan’s roast potatoes only use three ingredients

So Vegan was set up by Roxy Pope and Ben Pook in 2016. They wanted to make plant-based eating accessible to everyone, and their videos have since been watched by hundreds of millions of people all over the world. 

They describe their roast potato recipe as the “crispiest and fluffiest in the world,” and you’ll only need three ingredients. This one is an ideal choice if you’re pushed for time and won’t be able to traipse around the supermarket. 

Ingredients

  • Maris Piper Potatoes
  • Salt
  • Olive oil

Find the method here

Vegan roast potato recipe from BOSH!

Unless you’ve been living under a rock for the last two years, you’ll almost certainly be acquainted with BOSH!’s incredible recipes. 

Henry Firth and Ian Theasby have been dubbed the “vegan Jamie Olivers.” Their delicious and diverse food creations reached more than half a billion people in their first year. 

They say their recipe creates crispy and perfectly fluffy roast potatoes.

Ingredients

  • Maris Piper Potatoes 
  • ¼ cup salt (for the water)
  • ½ tbsp baking powder
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 5 cloves garlic (finely chopped)
  • 2 tbsp thyme (finely chopped)
  • 2 tbsp rosemary (finely chopped)
  • 1 tbsp salt (after boiling)
  • Pepper (to taste)

Find the method here 

Vegan roast potato recipe from Rachel Ama

Rachel Ama is a vegan chef and author who is known for her recipe books Vegan Eats and One Pot: Three Ways.

She has created this perfectly simple roast potato recipe, which only uses two ingredients. If you’re after a starting point recipe, or even want to experiment with some ingredients of your own, this is an ideal method to get you going.

Ingredients:

  • Maris Piper potatoes
  • Olive oil

Find the method here

Vegan roast potato recipe from School Night Vegan

School Night Vegan roast potatoes
School Night Vegan School Night Vegan has created these crispy and fluffy roast potatoes

School Night Vegan is run by plant-based food blogger Richard Makin. He was previously a lifelong vegetarian, but switched to vegan in November 2017. Since then, he has been perfecting the art of plant-based cooking. 

He says he used a “rigorous testing process” while creating his potatoes, and they should come out just as crispy and fluffy as any other. 

Ingredients

  • Sunflower oil
  • Rosemary
  • Potatoes (like Maris Piper)
  • Fine sea salt
  • Flaky sea salt

Find his method here




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